Not On My Nickel Introduces New Case Study Series

Almost a year ago, June 11, 2014, Market Watch wrote  “Here are Five Finance Bloggers You Should be Reading”   No, Not On My Nickel did not make the list.  We do not sell “advice”, as the five Market Watch selected Bloggers do.  We do not sell investment products.

Not On My Nickel empowers retirement investors to take charge to go direct to the best core retirement money manager who files audited performance at the SEC.  We streamline the distribution channel, through our soon to come digital platform and inter-active tools.

Nickel provides independent, unbiased information/reporting– a critical component for capitalism and price transparency.  In an attempt to distinguish between financial news that is simply “Sponsored Ads”, we encourage readers to take a look at Not On My Nickel’s review of what is presented as financial journalism and Blogs, through our new Case Study series.

Should these Blogs and news outlets all be labeled “Sponsored Advertising” so as to provide full disclosure? Is the average reader making retirement investment decisions based on financial journalists representing these sponsored ads as real news?

“About MarketWatch

MarketWatch, published by Dow Jones & Co., tracks the pulse of markets for engaged investors with more than 16 million visitors per month.”

Here is the Market Watch summary, from their article above, of the two Advisors/Bloggers for which NOMN presents Case Study Number One.

Market Watch Top Five Bloggers

In addition to their “finance blogs” Mr. Ritholtz is a regular contributor to Bloomberg, frequently endorsing his firm’s strategy and at his Blog.  Mr. Brown is a regular contributor to CNBC’s daily TV shows.

NOMN Case Study Number I of “Financial Bloggers to Read”

Nickel presents the first in our Series:  NOMN Case Study Digital Advice Platforms and Financial Bloggers- Lift Off.  Take a peak.

Market Watch’s Blogger list includes Mr. Ritholtz and Mr. Brown, who are in business together at Ritholtz Wealth Management and Lift Off.  Lift Off is Ritholtz and Brown’s digital solution as described here at Business Insider by Linnette Lopez on October 1, 2014

“A NYC Wealth Management Firm Created A Super Cheap Way For Young People To Get Professional Investment Help”

Lift Off and Ritholtz Wealth Management

 

Business Insider represents to the young this is a “superior cheap way for the young to get  professional investment help.” Really?

We attach our Flow Chart for you to determine if the young just starting out, are better off with the “first robo advisor for young people” according to Ritholtz and Brown, owners of Lift Off, and Business Insider?

Based on Not On My Nickel’s criteria for selecting who is worthy to manage retirement assets for the young, we find these two top Dow Jones Market Watch recommended Bloggers’ “digital platform”  lacking transparency and misleading:

  • They provide no publicly available historical performance or defined, published long-term investment strategy that has withstood the test of time given up and down markets.
  • They have not provided five year audited performance to the SEC.
  • Their selected custodian and brokerage firm have been cited by the SEC for trading in dark pools with retail retirement investors money and cross-examined by the Senate Banking Committee for conflicts of interest.
  • Fees are not transparent, in fact they take many hours to dissect.  Their website is misleading, as to fees.
  • Given the level of intermediaries, we cannot say the firm has truly shown they are operating in the best interest of their client.
  • Their “digital platform” increases the number of intermediaries, increasing all-in costs.

Is Lift Off’s Website Misleading?  See below.  Clients pay .4% fee to Lift Off and another .10% to Upside and .50% – 1.81% to Envestnet Asset Management’s sub advisors for all in fees of potentially 2.3%.  Portfolio turnover is not disclosed and brokerage fees are unknown, if TD Ameritrade trades in dark pools.  Four intermediaries cannot be deemed the “Next generation digital solution.”  Here is a shot from Lift Off’s home page:

Lift Off WebsiteConclusion

  • Lift Off is not using technology to streamline the “supply chain” for retirement investors.  They are adding an unnecessary complexity, that not only limits transparency to the retirement investor.  Lift Off increases fees through an increase in intermediaries. It appears that financial journalists, at both Business Insider and Dow Jones’ Market Watch are simply promoting the firms that provide them advertising revenue, to the detriment of the retirement investor, as the White House Economic Report warned last February.

“Conflicted investment advisors are costing retirement investors over $17 billion annually.”  These advisors and financial Bloggers thrive through less than ethical financial journalists, that put their profits over the safety and performance of America’s retirement investors.

  • The SEC is proposing that more data on holdings be gathered from Advisors, for both financial system systemic risk and protections of retirement investors, as outlined in this May 22, 2015 Reuter‘s article, “SEC proposes rules to gather more data on Funds, Advisors”.   The SEC states:  “Some of this new data would involve information about management of so-called “separate accounts,” or accounts that companies manage for individual clients, as opposed to pooled investment vehicles.” Lift Off places the young, through their online platform (Upside) in Envestnet Asset Management’s separate accounts.

The average 401k is $89,000.  If you give that $89,000 to Lift Off to manage, before unknown brokerage fees and other ETF/mutual fund fees, you have given your intermediaries over $2000 annually.  If interest rates remain low, with the stock market at record highs, the young might be actually losing money annually, with such high intermediary fees.